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  • Meals

    Latvians usually eat 3 meals a day. Breakfast is normally light and usually consists of sandwiches or an omelette, with a drink, often milk. Lunch is eaten from noon to 3 p.m. and tends to be the main meal of the day; as such it can include a variety of foods, and sometimes also soup as an entrée and a dessert. Supper is the last meal of the day, with some choosing to eat another large meal.
    • Cusine
  • National Cuisine

    Latvian cuisine typically consists of agricultural products, with meat featuring in most main meal dishes. Fish is commonly consumed due to Latvia's location on the Baltic Sea. Latvian cuisine has been influenced by the neighboring countries. Common ingredients in Latvian recipes are found locally, such as potatoes, wheat, barley, cabbage, onions, eggs and pork. Latvian food is generally quite fatty, and uses few spices. The Latvian cuisine offers plenty of varieties of bread and milk products, which are an important part of the Latvian cuisine. A national liquor is Riga Black Balsam.
    • Cusine
  • Taste Them

    Grey peas and ham are generally considered as staple foods of Latvians. Sorrel soup is also consumed by Latvians. Rupjmaize is a dark bread made from rye, considered the national staple. A traditional Latvian dessert is maizes zupa (literally "bread soup"), which is the sweet soup made from rye bread and fruits. A traditional Latvian cheese is Jāņu siers (caraway cheese); this is traditionally served during the celebration of Jāņi or midsummer. Sklandrausis is traditional dish in Latvian cuisine; it's a sweet pie, made of rye dough and filled with potato and carrot paste and seasoned with a caraway.
    • Cusine
  • Olympics

    Latvia has participated successfully in both Winter and Summer Olympics. The most successful Olympic athlete in the history of independent Latvia has been Māris Štrombergs, who became a two-time Olympic champion in 2008 and 2012 at Men's BMX.
    • Sport
  • Bobsleigh and Skeleton

    Bobsleigh and Skeleton

    Bobsleigh is also one of kind of sports Latvians are proud of. Latvian athlets - Zintis Ekmanis and Jānis Ķipurs - won bronze and gold in Sarajevo (1984) and Calgary (1988) accordingly where they participated in Olympics within the USSR's team.Sochi are now Latvia’s most successful Winter Olympics in history. Oskars Melbārdis with teammates Daumants Dreikšens, Arvis Vilkaste and Jānis Streng won silver medal with only 0.09 seconds separating Latvia's bobsleigh team from the first place holder Russia’s team. Martins Dukurs won silver in skeleton racing, but Andris and Juris Šici bronze in the men's luge doubles. Mārtiņš Rubenis, Elīza Tīruma and the Šici brothers won also bronze in the luge team relay competition. Latvia is also the only small nation to ever win an Olympic medal in bobsleigh, the sport being dominated by countries like Russia, USA, Germany, Switzerland etc.
    • Sport
  • Basketball

    The second most popular sport is basketball. Latvia has a long basketballing tradition, as the Latvian national basketball team won the first ever EuroBasket in 1935 and silver medals in 1939, after losing an impressively tenacious final to Lithuanians by one point. Latvia had many European basketball stars like Jānis Krūmiņš, Maigonis Valdmanis, Valdis Muižnieks, Valdis Valters, Igors Miglinieks, as well as NBA players Gundars Vētra and Andris Biedriņš. At the moment the best known Latvian player is Kristaps Porziņģis who plays in the NBA for the New York Knicks. Currently, VEF Rīga, which competes in EuroCup, is the strongest professional basketball club in Latvia.
    • Sport
  • Ice Hockey

    Ice hockey is usually considered the most popular sport in Latvia. Latvia has had many famous hockey stars like Helmut Balderis, Artūrs Irbe, Kārlis Skrastiņš and Sandis Ozoliņš. Dinamo Riga is the country's strongest hockey club, playing in the KHL. The national tournament is the Latvian Hockey Higher League, held since 1931. The 2006 IIHF World Championship was held in Riga.
    • Sport
  • Precipitation vs. Sunny days

    Precipitation vs. Sunny days

    Latvia's proximity to the sea brings high levels of humidity and precipitation, with average annual precipitation of 633 millimeters in Riga. There, an average of 180 days per year have precipitation, 44 days have fog, and only 72 days are sunny. Continuous snow cover lasts 82 days, and the frost-free period lasts 177 days.
    • Climate
  • Other Recorded Weather Extremes

    Strongest wind was on the 2nd of November 1969 and it was 34-48 m/s. The most days with thunderstorms was recorded in 1954 on Vidzeme Upland and there were 52. Longest-lasting fog was in 1958 in Aluksne and it lasted for 93 hours. The most days with fog in a year were 143 and they were registered in Gaiziņkalns in 1946. Last spring frost was on 24th of June in 1982, but first fall frost on 15th of August in 1975. The thickest snow cover (126 cm) was on Gaiziņkalns in March 1931. There was 160 mm of max daily precipitation in Ventspils on 9th of July 1973, but there wasn't any precipitation for a whole May in 1938 and 1941.
    • Climate
  • Springs and Autumns

    Springs and Autumns

    Spring starts in mid-March and lasts until beginning of June, but autumn starts in September and lasts until mid-December. Spring and autumn bring fairly mild weather.
    • Climate
  • Summers

    Summers

    Summers have average temperatures of around 19 °C, with extremes of 35 °C. Summers are usually warm and sunny, with cool evenings and nights. The highest temperature was recorded in Ventspils on 4th of August 2014 and it was: +37,8 °C.
    • Climate
  • Winters

    Winters

    The average temperatures in winter are of −6 °C. Winters are characterized by stable snow cover, bright sunshine, and short days. Severe spells of winter weather with cold winds, extreme temperatures of around −30 °C and heavy snowfalls are common.The lowest temperature was recorded in Daugavpils on 8th of February 1956 and it was: −43,2 °C.
    • Climate
  • Climate

    The country has a temperate seasonal climate. Coastal regions, especially the western coast, possess a more maritime climate with cooler summers and milder winters, while eastern parts exhibit a more continental climate with warmer summers and harsher winters. Latvia has four pronounced seasons of near-equal length.
    • Climate
  • Amber

    Amber

    Amber, fossilized tree resin, is one of Latvia's most important cultural symbols. In ancient times, amber found along the Baltic Sea coast was sought by Vikings as well as traders from Egypt, Greece and the Roman Empire. This led to the development of the Amber Road.
    • Symbols
  • Non-official Symbols

    Oak and linden are Latvia's national trees and the daisy its national flower. The white wagtail is Latvia's national bird. Its national insect is the two-spot ladybird. Daugava also called "River of Destiny" is Latvia’s largest and historically most important river.
    • Symbols
  • Flag

    The Latvian flag dates back to the 13th century, being one of the oldest in the world. The carmine-red flag with a white band in the middle is simbolical of the Latvian history. The color on the flag is referred to as "Latvian Red".
    • Symbols
  • Anthem

    Composed by Kārlis Baumanis, the anthem "Dievs, svētī Latviju!” (God, bless Latvia!) was initially sung at the very first Latvian Song Festival in 1873. The Constitutional Assembly of the Republic of Latvia chose the song as the national anthem in 1920. Also the Latvian 2 euro coins bear the inscription of anthem’s title around the edge.
    • Symbols
  • National Landmark

    The Freedom Monument is is the most important landmark, the symbol of Latvian independence and statehood. Designed by Kārlis Zāle and funded through public donations in 1935. The inscription "Tēvzemei un brīvībai” means "For Fatherland and Freedom". The sculptural reliefs at its base depict important moments in Latvia’s history, while the woman at the top symbolizes Latvia’s freedom and sovereignty. She holds aloft three stars indicative of the three historical districts of Latvia - Kurzeme-Zemgale, Vidzeme, Latgale.
    • Landmarks
    • Symbols
  • Coat of Arms

    Latvian statehood and national identity is illustrated with symbols such as three stars, the sun, the sea and oak leaves. Historical geographic districts of Kurzeme and Zemgale are represented by a red lion, while Vidzeme and Latgale are depicted by a silver griffin.
    • Symbols
  • Official Symbols

    Like all countries in the world Latvia has anthem, flag, coat of arms and national landmark.
    • Symbols
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